May 14, 2007
del_yahi

[عيش ودجاج] Chicken & Rice

Rice in Arabic is called A’ruz, but in the majority of the Gulf states nobody calls it by its proper Arabic name and instead refer to it as Aish (3aish), which literally means “the state of living” or “life”.

Rice is a principal element in the Gulf diet and it has to be served for every-single-lunch-meal. Many nationals in the area will not consider a meal they eat around noon time without rice a ‘lunch meal’.

It is interesting to notice the distinction between the naming convention of rice based meals in Arabic and English. In English, the meal is called ‘something and rice’ while in Arabic Khaleeji dialect, the rice always comes first, it is Aish wa Laham (rice and meat), or Aish was Samak (rice and fish). Another interesting fact is the different usage of the word Aish in other Arabic states, such as the Mediterranean Arab states and Egypt, where Aish means bread and not rice, as bread is the principal element of of the majority of the meals served there.

Our dish today is a very basic ‘aish’ meal, check out the ingredients and method on how to make your own ‘aish’.

Ingredients

  • 2 mugs of rice (Uncle bens rice)
  • 400g of boneless chicken diced into small cubes
  • 2 medium onions sliced into short wide strips
  • 2 medium capsicums sliced into short wide strips
  • 2 medium tomatoes diced into small cubes
  • 2 clovers of garlic crushed
  • chili crushed
  • tomato paste
  • mixed chicken spices
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 lemon

Method

Chicken

  1. Put the chicken in an oiled heated pot and stir until it turns white then add salt, pepper, and mixed chicken spices.
  2. Add the onion, capsicum, tomato, garlic, and chili to the mix and then stir and leave for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the tomato paste and a mug of water. Mix and add the juice of the lemon.
  4. Lower the heat and leave for 15 minutes or until the chicken is cooked. You can add more water to the chicken if all the water in the pot evaporates and the chicken is not yet cooked.

Rice

  1. Add only a quarter of a mug of rice to an oiled pot and stir until the rice turns brown.
  2. Add the rest of the rice to the pot and add 3 mugs of water. Add salt to it, stir well, cover and leave for 20 minutes on low heat.
  3. Remove the pot from the cooker and leave on the side for 5 minutes before serving.
  • muscati

    How come you always use Uncle Bens rice, is it because it is easier to cook than basmati, or because it looks better in the pictures? Then again maybe you prefer it over basmati?

  • Blue Chi

    I cannot remember why Ahmed suggested we buy Uncle Bens rice for the the fish dish, but I know that we used it THIS time because we had a lot of it left over from the first time. 😛

  • Del_Yahi

    To tell you the truth, I only cooked rice twice in my life(this time and the Fish time!!!!). In both of them, i used Uncle Bens rice. Therefor i can’t say if it is easier or harder than using basmati.

    And i do prefer uncle bens rice 😉

  • Blue Chi

    I think that UB rice is easier to cook than basmati rice because it does not become mushy or too watery as easy as basmati rice.

  • Del_Yahi

    bluechi is the basmati expert;)

  • Shaima’a Alkandari

    iam start hungry righ know

    but i wont to say

    i like rice all of rice is good

    it was testy

  • I think that UB rice is easier to cook than basmati rice because it does not become mushy or too watery as easy as basmati rice.

  • I think that UB rice is easier to cook than basmati rice because it does not become mushy or too watery as easy as basmati rice.

  • I am so glad I found another food blogger in the Gulf.  Were very few 🙂 My name is Noor and I own Ya Salam Cooking 🙂

  • Miranda

    What sort of spices do you suggest for the “mixed chicken spices”?